A “Community Devotional” based on 1 Thessalonians 1

Scriptures

Reference to the Importance of Community

1 Th 1:1 The only time we find Paul alone is when he was subjected to forced isolation. Otherwise, you see the apostle with his missionary companions. The Gospels and letters that make up the New Testament were composed by two or more, delivered by two or more, and received by two or more. They were by a group for a group. Consider writing a short message of thanks and encouragement to another group this next month.
1 Th 1:2-3 Prayer is the primary expression of our dependence upon God and outlet for our interdependency with other believers. The act of praying for one another is both a practical and “super-communal” action that empowers believers to live for Christ and make a difference in the world for Him. Here and elsewhere in his letters, Paul shares his love and appreciation for his brothers and sisters in Christ through prayer. Thus prayer is a critical aspect of how we love one another and build biblical community. In fact, biblical community cannot grow without prayer. Consider asking each person in your group to take ‘ownership in prayer’ for an aspect of the Acts 2 dynamic to grow and be strengthened.
1 Th 1:4-5 Right away, Paul declares what he and his friends at a distance hold in common: Union in Christ. The church in Thessalonica was established because Paul and his fellow workers planted themselves among the people there. Notice how his self-references in this verse take on the plural form. The Holy Spirit used the witness of their words and lifestyle to impact the recipients of the Gospel with power and conviction. In other words, Paul and his traveling companions lived out the Gospel as community within a community trailblazing a path of salvation to the hearts of the lost. They lived in Thessalonica for the sake of their neighbors and apparently, their witness was obvious and memorable. Ponder July’s outreach idea and how your group can have a similar presence in your community.
1 Th 1:6 Paul and his friends took Jesus’ commission (Mt 28:19-20) to heart and really modeled the Gospel to their host community. They did so in the face of serious resistance and rejection (Acts 17:1-9). He not only told them the Good News, He showed them the Good News. There are consequences for everyone who receives Christ. For most people, they want to know they’re not going to be alone ‘on the other side’. Paul and his friends brought this reassurance for the Thessalonians who were apparently experiencing “severe suffering” as a result of their new-found faith. They provided the encouragement and the example for being a follower of Jesus Christ. Their ‘other-focused dwelling’ within Thessalonica opened a channel through which God’s Kingdom could advance. A “community on mission” is God’s plan for each local church and small group. How could your small group be such an example that onlookers would welcome the Gospel with joy, even in the face of resistance? Here is a group activity you might want to do this month: Think of what needs & desires your small group could meet of people within your sphere of influence and then brainstorm how you could communicate (dare say, “advertise”) this in your community.
1 Th 1:7-10 Thessalonica was a very large city and strategic crossroads for trade and communication. Paul knew this and leveraged its influence for the spread of the Gospel. There was enough interaction happening among cities at that time that this fledgling church proved to be of great influence early in its existence even to new churches over 100 miles away. Just as Paul was an example for this community so this community of Christians was an effective witness to other church plants. Their faith, like Paul’s, manifested in loving efforts that influenced unbelievers and inspired believers. (cf. v. 3). The way their lived out their faith spoke for itself. Small groups provide the way to bring the living presence of the Good News to people who might not want to look for answers to their spiritual questions at a church service, at least initially. Ask the Lord to give your small group insight and inspiration on how it can be an encouraging example to other Christian communities. This chapter also explains why it is so important to share the stories of what God is doing in your small group with the leadership of your church: Encouragement (believers) and influence (unbelievers). God uses story-telling to develop and expand the community life of His Church. Here’s an easy way to partner with Him in doing this: Record stories of life-change you witness in your small group and then ‘pass it on’ to church leadership to be shared with others.

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